San Mauro Torinese

HQ design, 1981

Issue 570 of the magazine Domus in 1977 thus reported the San Mauro architectural project: the Burgo complex has a production unit that brings to mind the satellite city of “Space Odyssey” a giant wheel exalting the functional moments of the organization inside this paper manufacturing complex where each operational unit can be likened to a smaller wheel where each moves in response to the other: an articulate space, well constructed and unperceivable from the outside clad with an imaginative skin of particular elements, now well experimented, and certainly of international taste.
 

 


Oscar Niemeyer

Oscar Niemeyer was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1907. He graduated from the Escola Nacional de Belas Artes in Rio de Janeiro in 1934 and joined a team of Brazilian architects collaborating with Le Corbusier on a new Ministry of Education and Health building in Rio and in 1939 Niemeyer and Costa designed the Brazilian pavilion at the New York World Fair.
In 1956 he became the architectural consultant for Nova Cap – an organization assigned the task of realizing Lucio Costa’s projects for the new capital of Brazil. The following year he became Nova’s architectural director and designed most of the more important office buildings in the city such as the National Congress building, the Planalto building, the Supreme Federal Courts, the Arcos building, the Cathedral and the Juscelino Kubitschek museum. Buildings that have become milestones of modern symbolism.
Niemeyer continued working at Brasilia until 1964 when his political affiliation with the communist party forced him into exile in France. While he was in Europe he designed, among other buildings, the French Communist Party headquarters and the University of Constantine in Algiers. At the end of the 1960’s, with the fall of dictatorship, he returned to Brazil where he taught at the University in Rio while also working in private practice.
The Oscar Niemeyer museum in Curitaba, of his own design, was opened to the public in 2002 and in 2004 he was awarded the Praemium Imperiale for architecture. Niemeyer is considered to be among the first to have experimented new architectural concepts, developing a fluid sculptural style (in a period such as the 1930’s where international style was conditioned to straight lines and right angles) and making use of reinforced concrete to create sensational structures mirroring the sinuous natural curves of the mountains, the beaches and the bay of Rio de Janeiro.
Although semi-retired, Oscar Niemeyer who recently celebrated his 100th birthday in 2007, still works at the drawing board in his Copacabana office in Rio.

www.niemeyer.org.br

Oscar Niemeyer